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DoctorHOOper

Dr "HOO" & the Big Blue Box

Doctor Who's TARDIS and books...bigger on the inside and can take you any where in space and time. An open mind begins with an open book.

Currently reading

Child of the Dark: The Diary of Carolina Maria de Jesus
Audalio Dantas, David St. Clair, Robert M. Levine, Carolina Maria de Jesus
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Teaching Tolerance Text Selection Tool 1
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Yeh-Shen: A Cinderella Story from China - Ai-Ling Louie

The pictures attached are the Teaching Tolerance Text Selection Tool which I utilized for analyzing cultural authenticity.  

 

Citation

Louie, Ai-Ling, and Ed Young. Yeh-Shen: A Cinderella Story from China. New York: Philomel, 1982. Print.

 

Synopsis

This version of the Cinderella story, in which a young girl overcomes the wickedness of her stepsister and stepmother to become the bride of a prince, is based on ancient Chinese manuscripts written 1000 years before the earliest European version.

 

Author

Ai-Ling Louie was born in New York City in 1949 and was raised in the suburbs while attending public shool. Her mother was the first Chinese-American teacher hired by the New York Public Schools. Her father was hired by a tap and tool company on Long Island as a machinist and first the company's first non-white employee. She graduated from Sarah Lawrence College and received her graduate degree from Wheelock College.  She became an elementary school teacher and children's librarian. Louie noticed there weren't many children's biographies about Asian Americans. The tale of Yeh-Shen had been told in her family for three generations when, to her surprise, a research trail led Ms. Louie to the Cinderella of her grandmother's story as recorded in an ancient Chinese manuscript, which is reproduced in this book.

 

Awards

ALA Notable Book, IRA-CBC Children's Choice Book, A School Library Journal Best Book of the Year

 

Grades 4-5, ages 9-10, Chinese folklore

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The Rough-Face Girl - Rafe Martin, David Shannon

The pictures attached are the Teaching Tolerance Text Selection Tool which I utilized for analyzing cultural authenticity.  

 

Citation

Martin, Rafe, and David Shannon. The Rough-face Girl. New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1992. Print.

 

Synopsis

In an Algonquin village by the shores of Lake Ontario, many young women have tried to win the affections of the powerful Invisible Being who lives with his sister in a great wigwam near the forest. Then comes Rough-Face Girl, scarred from working by the fire. Can she succeed where her beautiful, cruel sisters have failed?

 

Author

Rafe Martin grew up in New York.  He  is married with two children.  After the birth of his children, he came to find the importance of stories as he read to them every night.  He also found that he could pass on messages of cause and effect and help people stay mindful of memories.  More importantly, he found stories were a way to discover universal patterns that run through each life.  In the past forty years, Martin has been investigating, working with and writing about these ancient, traditional Buddhist teachings for over forty years. For the past several years, he has been sharing the Jatakas and his profound interpretations of them in a teaching capacity at Buddhist communities throughout the world.

 

Awards

IRA Teachers' Choice Book, ABC Children's Booksellers' Choice, Georgia Children's Picture Storybook Award, Nebraska's Golden Sower Award

 

Grades 4-5, ages 9-10, Native American Mythology...folklore with non-fiction information

Teaching Tolerance Text Selection Tool 1
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Lon Po Po: A Red-Riding Hood Story from China - Ed Young

The pictures attached are the Teaching Tolerance Text Selection Tool which I utilized for analyzing cultural authenticity.  

 

Citation

Young, Ed, Ed Young, John Stevens, and Nanette Stevenson. Lon Po Po: A Red-Riding Hood Story from China. New York: Philomel, 1989. Print.

 

Synopsis

"Not for the faint-hearted, Lon Po Po (Grandmother Wold), is a tale of a menacing danger and courage.

 

Author

Ed Young was born in Tientsin China and grew up Shanghai.  Later he moved to Hong Kong.  He moved to the United States on a student visa to study architecture but turned instead to his love of art.  Young began as a commercial artist but soon discovered that children's books offered him an opportunity  for more expression.  Young places great emphasis on researching his work and hopes his work expands his reader's awareness.  He seeks for his readers to become active participants in reading.  Young is the illustrator of over eighty books for children, seventeen of which he has also written.

 

Young has a degree from the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena and has taught at the Pratt Institute, Yale University, Naropa Institute, and the University of California at Santa Cruz.   In 1990, his book Lon Po Po was awarded the Caldecott Medal. He has also received two Caldecott Honors – for The Emperor and the Kite and Seven Blind Mice – and was twice nominated for the Hans Christian Andersen Medal, the highest international recognition given to children's book authors and illustrators who have made a lasting contribution to children's literature.  Young lives in Westchester County, New York, with his two daughters, and two cats.

 

Awards

1990 Randolph Caldecott Medal for Most Distinguished Picture Book

 

Grades 4-5, ages 9-10, Children's literature, folktales, myths

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Dancing Drum: A Cherokee Legend (Native American Legends) - Terri Cohlene, Charles Reasoner

The pictures attached are the Teaching Tolerance Text Selection Tool which I utilized for analyzing cultural authenticity.  

 

Citation

Cohlene, Terri. Dancing Drum. Vero Beach, FL: Rourke, 1990. Print.

 

Synopsis

This enchanting Cherokee legend comes alive through the author's vivid adaptation and striking illustrations. Children will be spellbound as they read about the distinctive lifestyle and beliefs of the Cherokee people. Full color.

 

Author

Terri Cohlene is a white female from Skyway, Washington.  She is a former art director and taught in a community college.  She is now a freelance editor.  Her writing career began in 1981 and does not appear to have any window or sliding glass door experiences with the culture about which she writes.

 

Awards

None found

 

Grades 4-5, ages 9-10, Native American Mythology...folklore with non-fiction information

Teaching Tolerance Text Selection Tool 1
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The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian - Ellen Forney, Sherman Alexie

The pictures attached are the Teaching Tolerance Text Selection Tool which I utilized for analyzing cultural authenticity.  

 

Citation

Alexie, Sherman, and Ellen Forney. The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-time Indian. New York: Little, Brown, 2007. Print.

 

Synopsis

In his first book for young adults, bestselling author Sherman Alexie tells the story of Junior, a budding cartoonist growing up on the Spokane Indian Reservation. Determined to take his future into his own hands, Junior leaves his troubled school on the rez to attend an all-white farm town high school where the only other Indian is the school mascot. Heartbreaking, funny, and beautifully written, The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, which is based on the author's own experiences, coupled with poignant drawings by acclaimed artist Ellen Forney, that reflect the character's art, chronicles the contemporary adolescence of one Native American boy as he attempts to break away from the life he was destined to live.

 

Author

Sherman Alexie is a Spokane/Coeur d'Alene Indian.  He was born on October 7, 1966 and grew up in Wellpinit, Washington, on the Spokane Indian Reservation.  Alexie has been an urban Indian since 1994 and lives in Seattle with his family.

 

Awards

National Book Award for Young People's Literature (2007), School Library Journal Best Book of the Year (2007), Odyssey Award for Excellence in Audiobook Production Honor (2009), American Indian Library Association Award, South Carolina Book Award Nominee for Young Adult Book Award (2010) Michigan Library Association Thumbs Up! Award Nominee (2008), Florida Teens Read Nominee (2009), American Indian Youth Literature Award for Best Young Adult Book (2008), Boston Globe-Horn Book Award (2007), The Inky Awards Nominee for Silver Inky (2009), Abraham Lincoln Award Nominee (2011), James Cook Book Award Nominee (2009), The Inky Awards Shortlist for Silver Inky (2009)

 

Grades 9-10, ages 14-15, Native American Mythology...folklore with non-fiction information

Teaching Tolerance Text Selection Tool 1
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Turquoise Boy (Native American Legends & Lore) - Cohlene

The pictures attached are the Teaching Tolerance Text Selection Tool which I utilized for analyzing cultural authenticity.  

 

Citation

Cohlene, Terri, and Charles Reasoner. Turquoise Boy. Vero Beach, FL: Rourke, 1990. Print.

 

Synopsis

A Navajo legend that explains how one young boy sought out a solution to the hardships of the Navajo life and brought horses to the tribe.

 

Author

Terri Cohlene is a white female from Skyway, Washington.  She is a former art director and taught in a community college.  She is now a freelance editor.  Her writing career began in 1981 and does not appear to have any window or sliding glass door experiences with the culture about which she writes.

 

Awards

None found

 

Grades 4-5, ages 9-10, Native American Mythology...folklore with non-fiction information

Teaching Tolerance Text Selection Tool 1
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Little Firefly (Native American Legends & Lore) - Terri Cohlene

The pictures attached are the Teaching Tolerance Text Selection Tool which I utilized for analyzing cultural authenticity.  

 

Citation

Cohlene, Terri. Little Firefly. Vero Beach, FL: Rourke, 1990. Print.

 

Synopsis

An Algonquian legend following closely to the Cinderella story. The legend shares the idea of good things coming to those who find peace and self-acceptance in the face of meanness from others.  Also describes the history and culture of the Algonquian Indians.

 

Author

Terri Cohlene is a white female from Skyway, Washington.  She is a former art director and taught in a community college.  She is now a freelance editor.  Her writing career began in 1981 and does not appear to have any window or sliding glass door experiences with the culture about which she writes.

 

Awards

None found

 

Grades 4-5, ages 9-10, Native American Mythology...folklore with non-fiction information

Teaching Tolerance Text Selection Tool 1
Teaching Tolerance Text Selection Tool 1
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Ka-Ha-Si and The Loon: An Eskimo Legend (Native American Legends) - Terri Cohlene, Charles Reasoner

The pictures attached are the Teaching Tolerance Text Selection Tool which I utilized for analyzing cultural authenticity.  

 

Citation

Cohlene, Terri, and Charles Reasoner. Ka-ha-si and the Loon: An Eskimo Legend. Mahwah, NJ: Watermill, 1990. Print.

 

Synopsis

An Eskimo legend explaining how the Earth stays in place. Also describes the history and culture of the Eskimo Indians.

 

Author

Terri Cohlene is a white female from Skyway, Washington.  She is a former art director and taught in a community college.  She is now a freelance editor.  Her writing career began in 1981 and does not appear to have any window or sliding glass door experiences with the culture about which she writes.

 

Awards

None found

 

Grades 4-5, ages 9-10, Native American Mythology...folklore with non-fiction information

Teaching Tolerance Text Selection Tool 1
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Quillworker: A Cheyenne Legend (Native American Legends) - Terri Cohlene, Charles Reasoner

The pictures attached are the Teaching Tolerance Text Selection Tool which I utilized for analyzing cultural authenticity.  

 

Citation

Cohlene, Terri, and Charles Reasoner. Quillworker. Vero Beach, FL: Rourke, 1990. Print.

 

Synopsis

A Cheyenne legend explaining the origins of the stars. Also describes the history and culture of the Cheyenne Indians.

 

Author

Terri Cohlene is a white female from Skyway, Washington.  She is a former art director and taught in a community college.  She is now a freelance editor.  Her writing career began in 1981 and does not appear to have any window or sliding glass door experiences with the culture about which she writes.

 

Awards

None found

 

Grades 4-5, ages 9-10, Native American Mythology...folklore with non-fiction information

Summary

Cheyennes: People/The Plain - Nancy Bonvillain

Examines the history, culture, way of life, and contemporary problems of the Cheyennes, a Native American tribe that dominated the Plains region in the nineteenth century.

Summary

Skywalkers: Mohawk Ironworkers Build the City by Weitzman, David (2010) Hardcover - David Weitzman

Narrative text and photographs examines Native American history and the development of structural engineering and architecture, focusing on Mohawk ironworkers.

Summary

The Ancient Cliff Dwellers of Mesa Verde - Caroline Arnold

Discusses the native Americans known as the Anasazi, who migrated to southwestern Colorado in the first century A.D. and mysteriously disappeared in 1300 A.D. after constructing extensive dwellings in the cliffs of the steep canyon walls.

Summary

Battlefields and Burial Grounds: The Indian Struggle to Protect Ancestral Graves in the U.S - Roger C. Echo-Hawk

Describes the efforts of Native Americans to rebury ancestral human remains and grave offerings held by museums and historical societies, with particular emphasis on the Pawnees and their struggle to reclaim their dead.

Summary

You Are Now on Indian Land: The American Indian Occupation of Alcatraz Island California, 1969 - Margaret J. Goldstein

Examines how occupation of Alcatraz Island during 1969 helped focus internation attention to the plight of Native Americans and helped to end the policy of Termination and Relocation.

Summary

The Earliest Americans - Helen Roney Sattler, Jean Day Zallinger

"In a handsome companion volume to her HOMINIDS, Sattler chronicles the arrival of humankind to North America . . . The author presents theories on migration patterns, dates, and technological developments, indicating whether they are widely accepted or hotly debated. This scholarly whole is accompanied by several maps, an index, and a time line of contemporary cultures and developments in the Americas, Europe, Asia, and Africa. There is also an extremely detailed 14-page bibliography listed chapter by chapter." -School Library Journal

Summary

Raven: A Trickster Tale from the Pacific Northwest - Gerald McDermott

Raven, the Native American trickster, feels sorry for those who must live in darkness, and he decides to help. He flies over mountains, valleys, and lakes and discovers that light is being kept hidden inside the house of the Sky Chief. Using his cleverness, Raven finds a way to bring light to the world. "The physical environment, oral literature, and traditional life of the Pacific Coast Indians come alive in this amusing and well-conceived picture book."-- School Library Journal