2 Followers
DoctorHOOper

Dr "HOO" & the Big Blue Box

Doctor Who's TARDIS and books...bigger on the inside and can take you any where in space and time. An open mind begins with an open book.

Currently reading

Child of the Dark: The Diary of Carolina Maria de Jesus
Audalio Dantas, David St. Clair, Robert M. Levine, Carolina Maria de Jesus
Teaching Tolerance Text Selection Tool 1
Teaching Tolerance Text Selection Tool 1
Teaching Tolerance Text Selection Tool 2
Teaching Tolerance Text Selection Tool 2
Teaching Tolerance Text Selection Tool 3
Teaching Tolerance Text Selection Tool 3
Teaching Tolerance Text Selection Tool 4
Teaching Tolerance Text Selection Tool 4
Mufaro's Beautiful Daughters: An African Tale (Picture Puffin) - John Steptoe

The pictures attached are the Teaching Tolerance Text Selection Tool which I utilized for analyzing cultural authenticity.  

 

Citation

Steptoe, John, John Steptoe, and John Stevens. Mufaro's Beautiful Daughters: An African Tale. New York: Lothrop, Lee & Shepard, 1987. Print.

 

Synopsis

This is the tale of Mufaro's two daughters, two beautiful girls who react in different ways to the king's search for a wife - one is aggressive and selfish, the other kind and dignified. The king takes on disguises to learn the true nature of both girls and of course chooses Nyasha, the kind and generous daughter, to be his queen.

 

Author

Born in 1950, John Steptoe was raised in Brooklyn, NY.  He began drawing as a young child and received formal art training at the High School of Art and Design in Manhattan. He also attended the Vermont Academy, where he studied under the sculptor John Torres, a widely acclaimed painter.  While all of Steptoe's work deals with aspects of the African American experience, MUFARO'S BEAUTIFUL DAUGHTERS was acknowledged by reviewers and critics as a breakthrough. Based on an African tale recorded in the 19th century, it required Mr. Steptoe for the first time to research African history and culture, awakening his pride in his African ancestry. Mr. Steptoe hoped that his books would lead children, especially African American children, to feel pride in their origins and in who they are.  John Steptoe died on August 28, 1989 at Saint Luke's Hospital in Manhattan, following a long illness. He was 38 years old and lived in Brooklyn. Mr. Steptoe was among the handful of African American artists who have made a career in children's books.

 

Awards

Caldecott Medal, Newberry Medal

 

Grades 4-5, ages 9-10, African folklore